Reconnecting with Nature at The Village House

Dreaming of sinking your feet into flour-soft sand, forging through the depths of the rainforest and enjoying the beautiful evening sunsets? While we wait to get the OK to travel again, plan out your trips to enjoy the outdoors at The Village House, located near Santubong.

Fun In the Sun
The Village House one (1) night stay with breakfast, lunch and dinner provided and Bike Tour for only RM180 nett per person
*Twin sharing basis in Village Double/Twin room

Get Wild at the Wetlands
The Village House one (1) night stay with breakfast, lunch and dinner provided and Bike Tour for only RM300 nett per person
*Twin sharing basis in Village Double/Twin room.

Summit Mount Santubong
The Village House one (1) night stay with breakfast, lunch and dinner and Bike Tour for only RM250 nett per person
*Twin sharing basis in Village Double/Twin room.

Book now till June 30, 2020 for stays from June 10 to December 31, 2020.

The Village House only accepts guest above 12 years of age.

For further enquiries, visit The Village House at https://villagehouse.com.my/.

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Legends of Sarawak’s Floating Natok Kon Sebauh Temple

Located about 48km from Bintulu, Sebauh is a small town with over 20,000 residents. Seated on an island directly opposite Sebauh is the floating Natok Kon Sebauh Temple.

Locals believed that the temple houses three deities that possess immense powers and will come to aid anyone in need. To get there, one must take a boat from the jetty. Upon arrival, you will notice that the temple is completely separated from land, surrounded by water. There are many legends on how the temple came along. The Chinese have their own version while the Ibans have theirs.

According to the local Chinese community, the legend involves three fishermen on board looking for wild ferns across the river before their boat was struck by a storm, flipped over and disappeared at the scene. A huge rock that resembles a boat then appeared at the spot where the boat sank. Apparently, when the moon is high, three figures in white robes can be seen lurking on the island.

A slightly light-hearted version involves three Malay fishermen; Haji Salleh, Tuanku Silai and Mohammad Su who were fishing at Kuala Sebauh a month before the Lunar New Year.  While having lunch on their boat, two fishes suddenly jumped up from the river and landed on Haji Salleh’s plate which made his friends laugh out loud. Then, a lizard from the roof of their boat dropped on to his plate, making them laugh even louder. They laughed so hard that the boat sank. Half a year later, an island appeared at the very site the boat sank and the three figures can often be seen on the island when the moon is high.

Meanwhile, the Iban folklore tells that there were three Malay sailors on a boat from Kuala Bintulu to Sebauh. One day, the cook had made some sago porridge. Instead of eating it, they played with the porridge by stretching and stirring it around each other’s heads. Their foolishness angered the Almighty, turning them into stones. A powerful shaman came along and charmed the stone boat, moving it to the current site. A long time ago, the island resembled a boat however, over the years, erosion took its toll.

Floating Temple Sebauh

Sarawak To Woo Local Tourists

The global COVID-19 outbreak has severely impacted the Tourism industry in Sarawak. In an effort to kick start recovery of the tourism sector, Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Sarawak, Datuk Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah said that the state is shifting its strategy, to focus on ASEAN and domestic markets.

“We are narrowing our focus to key markets, to be more integrated but achievable post-Covid-19,” adding that the state would be participating in domestic and regional marketing initiatives for this purpose. Domestic travel will play a huge role during this recovery. Hence, the reason for realigning our marketing strategy”, he said.

While travelling is unlikely at the moment due to health and safety reasons, Sarawak will focus on digital marketing as its core approach to increase destination visibility and connect with consumers to create confidence among partners, as well as travellers. We need to leverage on digital marketing to create ripple effect messages and remind travellers that Sarawak is waiting to be explored”, he added.

In the meantime, Sarawak is looking into improving the standards and quality of the state’s tourism products which includes creative packages, new tourism infrastructures, facilities and identifying other “wow” factor to push for arrivals.

Darulhana V2

Bung Sadung Climbathon Challenge 2020 Postponed

KUCHING – The 3rd Bung Sadung Climbathon Challenge scheduled to take place on August 30, 2020 has been postponed to a later date due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Those who have registered for the event will be reimbursed accordingly.

“It is unfortunate that the climbathon will not take place this year, but the safety and wellbeing of participants and the community is our top priority. We need to do our part to help break the transmission of COVID-19”, said the organising committee’s spokesperson.

This year’s climbathon is organised by Kampung Bunga’s Development and Security committee in collaboration with the Serian District Council and supported by Serian Resident Office and Tarat Sports and Recreation.

Photo shows the Bung Sadung Climbathon flag off in 2018. (Photo by Bung Sadung, Serian Sarawak)
Photo shows the Bung Sadung Climbathon flag off in 2018.
(Photo by Bung Sadung, Serian Sarawak)

Discovering The Heart Of Borneo: Bario Highlands

Bario, or pronounced as ‘bariew’, is a village located at the northeast of Sarawak, bordering the Indonesian Kalimantan. It is home to the Kelabit tribe, one of the many Orang Ulu (upriver) tribes in Sarawak.

Lying at an altitude of 3,500 feet above sea level, Bario surrounds you with air that is cool and light, where one long breath would instantly refresh you, hence, its name ‘bariew’ – which means wind in the Kelabit language. The wind here is as gentle as life itself mainly for farmers who still call it home.

It is also affectionately known as the ‘Land of a Thousand Handshakes’, which signifies how friendly the locals are as they will greet you as you wander around the community.

The Kelabit population is only about 6,000 in Sarawak, out of which only about 1,200 Kelabit are still in Bario and the Kelabit highlands as most of them, especially the younger generations have migrated to urban areas such as Lawas and Miri.

There are two ways of getting to Bario; by air and by road. The most popular method is to fly using MASWings from Miri to Bario, which takes about 45 minutes. However, for those who favour more adventure and have extra time at hand, take a road trip through the oldest rainforest in the world, from Lawas to Ba’kelalan via a 4-wheel drive and then a two days trek on foot to Bario.

Places like Bario and Ba’Kelalan are almost untouched by the modern, fast-paced, technology-driven world. This is why they are perfect for when you need to disconnect and unwind from the outside world while reconnecting with yourself.

To know more, visit Sarawak Tourism Website  https://sarawaktourism.com/story/bario-highlands-the-heart-of-borneo/

Photo shows a breathtaking view of one of the villages in Bario.  (Photo by Bario Travel Network)
Photo shows a breathtaking view of one of the villages in Bario.
(Photo by Bario Travel Network)

 

Touring Sarawak In The Safety Of Our Homes

Sarawak, the largest State in Malaysia is home to 27 ethnic groups, with 45 different dialects spoken every day and each has its own unique stories, traditions and beliefs to tell.

It’s most important festivals such as Eid al-Fitr (or Hari Raya Aidilfitri) and the Gawai Festival (Hari Gawai) are just around the corner, amidst a controlled Conditional Movement Control Order (CMCO). Travelling is still restricted at the moment due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

While we await to travel again, Sarawak Cultural Village (SCV), in cooperation with Sarawak Tourism Board (STB) is offering virtual tours of the different ethnic homes in Sarawak.

As these ethnic homes are geographically dispersed around Sarawak, the virtual tour will be centred in Sarawak Cultural Village (SCV) itself, an award-winning Living Museum located just across Damai Beach Resorts and Hotels. Visitors to SCV can experience Sarawak in just half a day by touring this 17-acre village as it provides a glimpse of the culture and lifestyles of the diverse ethnic groups in Sarawak.

This is an opportunity to relive the daily lives of the various peoples of Sarawak such as the Iban, Bidayuh, Orang Ulu, Penan, Melanau, Malay and Chinese at https://scv.com.my/plan-your-visit/ethnic-house/.

Photo of Orang Ulu Longhouse at Sarawak Cultural Village. (Photo by Borneo Travel Network)
Photo of Orang Ulu Longhouse at Sarawak Cultural Village.
(Photo by Borneo Travel Network)

Discovering Bintulu’s Giant Tortoise

An exciting discovery has been made at a little town called Batu Gajah, located in Bintulu, in Sarawak’s central region. Here, visitors can find Bintulu’s first ever Giant Tortoise!

Measuring at a size similar to a 2-storey building, the Giant Tortoise rock formation can be seen at the Samalaju Beach, Bintulu, which is about one and a half hour’s drive from Bintulu town.

Photographer, Michael Wong, who first visited the location with other photographers in September 2019, again visited the Giant Tortoise this year to capture some shots. “It was definitely a great experience for me. For those who are interested to visit this place, it is better to go whenever the weather is good via a four-wheel drive vehicle,” he said. 

Another visitor, known only as Mr. Ung said that the journey to the Giant Tortoise will also include driving through a 5km muddy road and sometimes, visitors might need to walk to get there, but it is worth the visit.

Photo shows Bintulu’s Giant Tortoise at Samalaju Beach.  (Photo by Michael Wong)
Photo shows Bintulu’s Giant Tortoise at Samalaju Beach.
(Photo by Michael Wong)

Re-Strategizing Sarawak Tourism Industry

KUCHING – The Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Sarawak, Datuk Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah believes that by re-strategizing the state’s tourism industry, it will help to rebound the industry back to its glory days.

“I strongly believe with the kind of products that we have like our greenery, our rivers, our cultures, and with the right support from the Government, I think maybe in a year and a half we would be able to restore our tourism sector,” he told reporters after a press conference with the Chief Minister of Sarawak, Datuk Patinggi Abang Haji Johari Tun Openg on the formation of the Sarawak Economic Action Council (SEAC).

In the press conference, the Chief Minister of Sarawak had also announced that the Council had reviewed the development strategies under the 12th Malaysia Plan as part of the State Economic Exit Strategy Post Covid-19.

Sarawak will anchor on two core principles; Digital Economy and Environmental Sustainability which consists of ten key propositions, which includes those beyond leisure tourism that affects the tourism industry.

Photo shows the Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Sarawak, Datuk Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah during a short interview after the press conference with Sarawak Chief Minister, Datuk Patinggi Abang Haji Johari Tun Openg on the formation of the Sarawak Economic Action Council (SEAC). (Photo courtesy of The Borneo Post Online)
Photo shows the Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Sarawak, Datuk Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah during a short interview after the press conference with Sarawak Chief Minister, Datuk Patinggi Abang Haji Johari Tun Openg on the formation of the Sarawak Economic Action Council (SEAC). (Photo courtesy of The Borneo Post Online)

Sarawak State Government’s Guidelines For The Re-Opening Of Economic & Social Activities During The Conditional Movement Control Order (CMCO) COVID-19

On May 1, 2020, the Malaysian Government had announced the implementation of the Conditional Movement Control Order (CMCO) to allow economic sectors to re-open from May 4 onwards.

With the announcement of CMCO, the Sarawak State Government had prepared guidelines and standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the re-opening of the state’s economic sectors starting May 12. However, any sector and activities involving mass gatherings, bodily contact, or where social distancing is not possible, cannot be implemented and shall remain restricted.

The guidelines can be found at the Sarawak Tourism Website at https://sarawaktourism.com/news/conditional-movement-control-order-cmco/.

SARAWAK STATE GOVERNMENT'S GUIDELINES FOR THE RE-OPENING OF ECONOMIC & SOCIAL ACTIVITIES DURING THE CONDITIONAL MOVEMENT CONTROL ORDER (CMCO) COVID-19For latest updates regarding other sectors and industries, stay tuned to the Sarawak Public Communication Unit (UKAS) official Facebook page or any of the trusted local news publications as mentioned above.

Closure Notice For Visitors’ Information Centres in Kuching, Sibu And Miri

To minimize the spread of COVID-19, the Government of Malaysia has issued a Restricted Movement Order which includes temporary closure of all government premises starting March 18 to May 12, 2020.

However, tourist information services are still available as follows:

Monday – Friday: 9am to 6pm

Saturdays, Sundays & Public Holidays: 9am to 3pm

Visitors’ Information Centre:

KuchingSibuMiri

Mr Loji Tungging
(+6012-8821711)

Ms Angela Linsam
(+6013-5396787)

Ms Jane Chong
(+6013-8165566)

Ms Nujaimi Laudin
(+6011-19832186)

Mr Alfonso McKenzie
(+6016-8785947 – National Parks)

Ms Affisiah Sijali
(+6014-2086488 – National Parks)

Ms Siti Nabzah
(+6010-9630572)

Ms Prisca Wong
(+6014-6567321)

Mr Jessie Mangka
(+6013-8282168)

Mr Mohd Amirul
(+6013-8131977)

Mr Yusup Labo
(+6013-8371007)

Ms Audrey Foo
(+6019-8904886)

For further information, visit our Visitors’ Information Centre Official Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/vicsarawak/ or www.sarawaktourism.com.

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